31 October 2019

.....and Completely Culpin

After spending what feels like months on my Stadens, I have been able to connect a few families but only within the file itself and sadly not into my main file. But hey ho, I’m sure it will happen soon…

So I turn my attention now to the Culpins who remain in my ‘Strays’ file; and on the first person, Adelaide Culpin, I managed to link her and her small family to the main file straight away!

Result!

Onwards, while the feeling of success lasts....

More soon.

22 October 2019

Strictly Staden

My current genealogy task is to sort out my “Strictly Staden“ file. This contains all the Staden names which I have gathered over the years but whose owners don’t belong in my main family file. Yet.

So far I have sorted into the Southampton branch and the Dorset/Devon branch; I'm now working on the first Derbyshire branch because there are an awful lot of them around near Hartington and the like.

I’m now halfway through “Derbyshire1“ and luckily it’s one family. Goodness only knows what’s going to happen with the rest!

More soon.

20 October 2019

RANDOMNESS

Nothing really about genealogy in this post except, perhaps, a small touch of Norwegian Royal Family history.......

I've been watching a film on the BBC iPlayer called "The King's Choice" about King Haakon of Norway and what happened when the Nazis invaded in 1940.  They were not, of course, the only family affected and, indeed, their royal cousins around Europe undoubtedly had similar problems; but I'd never really thought about it before.  For the record, I am no ardent Royalist.

I've read about how the various Royal families escaped to the UK or the USA as the Nazis made their way across Europe but it was always reported in a single sentence.  This film showed the process  involved and the decisions which had to be made.  It's a responsibility most fortunately denied to me but it was a most moving and tense film.

More soon.

10 October 2019

Mind the gap?

One of my friends has just politely reminded me of the large gap since I last posted on here, so here I am, somewhat embarrassed, and wondering what to ramble on about today.

During the last few months I’ve been working on a number of different trees on the website and I’m currently engaged in the Langford branch which has had to be completely rewritten for the last 200 years (by which I mean 200 years going backwards). The 1700s and 1600s being quite wrong, my cousin and I discovered, so he did the legwork and I checked some of it and now we have both redirected that part of our shared tree. So having had to take out a number of downward branches I’m now re-entering some of them and finding out all sorts of new things!

But who knows? I may well get distracted and go back to the Culpins which are always at the back of my mind and certainly having had coffee this morning wth a friend and fellow Culpin researcher I am already thinking I wonder what to do next with them.

Onwards then and I will do my best to be back son!

11 April 2019

While I’m waiting for an appointment for which I am horrendously early (I forgot that there’s far less traffic during school holidays) ......

When I transferred my data into my current website (uses TNG - try it, it’s brilliant) I became aware that my method of recording census information wasn’t going to work so I have been slowly working through all 17k people to change it. It may take a while longer yet but even I weary of going to the ‘Places’ page and seeing the most popular please listed as ‘age 1, scholar’!

So if you should find yourself on www.culpinconnection.co uk, please ignore the rather random places you may find.... ;-)

More soon.

4 April 2019

Mind the gap again.....

Is it too late to do the "Happy New Year" thing? 

I seem to have been absent a while.  But, hey, let's carry on with some random ramblings while I wait to see why "Tow away" signs and "No Parking" cones have been liberally scattered around the close.

I'm back to checking what I've done before and still find the odd mistake.  Thanks to the GRO online index of births including the mother's maiden name I have been able to find a few missing children: I like to match up the number of offspring with the info given on the 1911 census.

Yesterday's discovery included two new "Staden descendants" children and my favourite 1911 occuupation of the year so far:- "cinema ice cream salesman".  How good is that?  And, even better, it was a man.

Onwards....

12 November 2018

GREAT WAR CENTENARY: THE FAMILY RECKONING


So many young lives wasted. 

Finally it was over.  And the leaders started to prepare for a peace treaty which would sow the seeds of discontent, leading ultimately to another war twenty years hence.  In the meantime families were counting the cost…..                                                                                                                                                                                         
In the last four years I have commemorated all the men within my extended family who died and I felt it would now be good to think about the numbers.  At the local war memorial on Sunday the minister told the story of a family of six brothers: after five had died, the local vicar wrote to the Queen and the sixth son was found and returned to his family.  

I cannot claim six brothers serving at once but I did write about the four Pridmore brothers who died, and the three Hills boys who died in consecutive years. 

Then there were the two Blaydon brothers and their cousin.  Two pairs of Culpin brothers, the Free brothers from Australia and the Glew brothers.   And the Steward boys who died within three months of each other, and the Mendhams within three weeks of one another.  Not to mention the Stadens, uncle & nephew, from Bury St Edmunds.  

In all I recorded sixty-eight deaths; the oldest being 40 years old and the youngest aged just 17 years.  Five died on the first day of the Somme; nine in all commemorated on the Thiepval memorial.  Eight on the Menin Gate.  Thirty in total have no known grave.  Young George Culpin, the 17-year-old, drowned at Jutland.

 It was called "The war to end all wars".  History proves otherwise.  Lions led by donkeys?  I struggle to see past the lives thrown away because their leaders wanted them to march in an orderly fashion, line abreast, into barbed wire and machine guns. 

At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, we will remember them.